Syllk model updated

Hi to the Syllk followers…A couple of new model updates…

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International Journal update. A recent paper has now been accepted for publication. As soon as I can I will advise all the details.

Regards, Stephen

 



LinkedIn post ‘People, Process, Technology, and Associated Barriers to KM’

Another interesting post on LinkedIn, worth a read…

People, Process, Technology, and Associated Barriers to KM

(posted by Timothy Maciag Knowledge Analyst at eHealth Saskatchewan)

Barriers To Knowledge Sharing steve-dale.net

Knowledge sharing is the corner-stone of many organisations’ knowledge-management (KM) strategy. Despite the growing significance of knowledge sharing’s practices for organisations’ competitiveness and market performance, several barriers make it difficult for KM to achieve the goals and deliver a positive return on investment….

 

Hi Stephen,

thanks for your comments. I’ve just had a quick read-through of your PMOZ paper – looks very useful – I’ve down-loaded so that I can properly digest. It never ceases to amaze me why organizations still pay lip service to learning lessons, but in reality don’t appear to learn anything. Some examples that come to mind are the UK’s National Health System (NHS), and Social Care. Many instances of systematic child abuse, where “lessons will be learned” by police and social services…until the next time the same things happen in the same area involving the same authorities. “Lessons will be learnt” seems to be a mantra trotted out by those n authority, but nothing really seems to change.

I look forward to seeing further work in this area, and particularly the papers you mention that are currently being peer-reviewed.

Steve Dale

- See more at: http://steve-dale.net/2014/05/19/barriers-to-knowledge-sharing/#sthash.WOq37Lxc.dpuf



More Lessons Learned on LinkedIn

More Lessons Learned on LinkedIn

The following interesting LinkedIn and blog posts highlight the challenges we have with lessons learned:

Lesson Learned Fact Sheet  at Jose Carlos blog

Lessons Learned and when training hurts the future at David Griffiths K3- Cubed blog

Both of these posts supports the Syllk model in highlighting the barriers of lessons learned and discussion around the learning element of the model.

Enjoy :-)

Stephen

 

 



Project Management Around the world #pmFlashBlog: Project organisations require a new paradigm for organisational learning through projects

Project Management Around the world #pmFlashBlog: Project organisations require a new paradigm for organisational learning through projects.

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(Picture Source: Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com reports)

At the end of the last #PMFlashBlog I highlighted a 2011 project management PM World Today editorial post on Lessons Learned but Knowledge Lost, where  Wideman a recognized project management global expert stated:  “…in spite of all the technology that is available to us today, we have not yet found a presentation format that captures the essence of this wisdom in a way that is relevant to future usage, readily searchable and easy to store. …we have a serious cultural problem. …we are probably condemned to continue to throw away the valuable resources.”

The majority of project managers think of lessons learned as… follow a process and enter your lessons learned into a tool…am I right?  Well the focus on with this #pmFlashBlog will be on the various Project Management guides and models on lessons learned.

Not for the want of opinions, guides, and models on lessons learned

Generally speaking, there are many opinions and guides, but little practical advice regarding workable processes that effectively enable the organisation to learn from past project experiences. Over the last 14 years the PMBOK® Guide has increased its references to the term lessons learned. In the PMBOK® Guide 4th edition there is a focus on process improvement as a result of lessons learned. However, in the PMBOK® Guide 4th and 5th editions the ‘lessons learned’ process is not discussed anywhere except for a glossary description and both versions refer to a different description on what is a lesson learned. PMBOK® Guide 5th edition has an additional twenty two references (mainly due to a new knowledge area – Stakeholder Management) and still remains focussed on project closure lesson learned activities. The PMBOK® Guide 5th edition also aligns with the Knowledge Management (KM) Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom (DIKW) model. However, the DIKW model which is based on the work of Ackoff (1989) has been challenged by the KM community as “unsound and methodologically undesirable” (Frické, 2009; Rowley, 2007; Vala-Webb, 2012).

Organisations are also not to be found wanting for lessons learned models and methods. The Project Management Institute’s OPM3 Organizational Project Management Maturity Model references lessons learned. However, there is less guidance than that provided in the PMBOK® Guide. The APM Body of Knowledge 6th Edition refers to knowledge management as the governance process rather than identification of the specific process around lessons learned and highlights the importance of people skills (communities of practice, learning and development) and delivery of information management. The Office of Government Commerce PRINCE2  project methodology encourages project teams to “…learn from previous experience: lessons are sought, recorded and acted upon throughout the life of the project”. PRINCE2 has a single process (a lessons learned log) for recording lessons learned and reporting on them (lessons learned report). The last to consider would be the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) model which provides for best practice organisational process improvement where process improvement proposals and process lessons learned are said to be key work products and sub-processes. The benefits of CMMI identifies the classic approach of collecting and translating key lessons into processes.

The Syllk model research to date…may influence changes to our Project Management guides?

 syllk model

 Syllk model (http://www.pmlessonslearned.info)

The Syllk model is developed to enable project organisations to learn from their past project experiences by capturing lesson learned from projects and distributing knowledge across an organisational network of elements such as people (individual learning, culture, social) and systems (technology, process and infrastructure).

This blog is about sharing project management lessons learned research findings. Initial research progress suggests that by reconceptualising lessons learned in terms of an adaptation of the Swiss cheese model for safety and accident prevention, the Syllk model can influence the identification, dissemination and application of project management lessons learned. Early results have established that the alignment of the people and system elements has the potential to positively influence the success of an organisation’s lessons learned processes and that the people element and culture factor may well be the most likely to negatively influence lessons learned in organisations.

Furthermore, the initial research progress has also established that several elements of the model need to align to ensure organisational lessons are learned by means of projects. Finally, the research findings will contribute to the project and knowledge management literature and provide an opportunity to improve project knowledge sharing, and ensure projects achieve success for organisations to maintain a competitive advantage.

Understanding the impact of culture and just culture was identified as a key factor in the research and this was supported by the strong parallels found with health care, nuclear power, rail and aviation organisations. By applying the Syllk model to an organisation and identifying the lessons learned and knowledge management facilitators and barriers one can better understand the organisational systems required to support an environment that captures, disseminates and applies lessons learned.

 Until next time…Thanks for reading, Stephen

 About “#PMFlashBlog – Project Management Around the World”: This post is part of the second round of the #PMFlashBlog where over 50 project management bloggers will release a post about their view of project management in their part of the world. 

 

 



Syllk update

It has been a while since the last post…starting a new role within a Safety organisation has opened up many new opportunities to explore the Syllk model, as I have always seen a strong association with safety culture having a positive impact on how an organsiation learns. I am now enrolled full-time on the PhD, so my workload has increased significantly along with the confirmation process. Good progress has been made on two projects as part of the PhD, early indications show the Syllk model does help organisations learn from mistakes of the past. The knowledge power of story telling will be revealed in the next post…



Syllk replaces the SLLCK model

As you know this blog supports my PhD research on pm lessons learned aka knowledge management. My initial work focused on a SLLCK model (systemic lessons learned and captured model) published in a PMOZ 2012 project management conference.

The on-going research work has refined the model to a systemic lessons learned knowledge model or Syllk model (current paper in journal peer review). This model is derived from an analysis of how complex adaptive systems learn and from how the Swiss cheese model for safety and systemic failures is successfully implemented for learning by health care, nuclear power, rail, and aviation organizations. The revised model focuses on the capturing, disseminating and application of lessons learned. The model is developed to enable project organizations to learn from their past project experiences by capturing lesson learned from projects and distributing knowledge across an organizational network of elements such as people (individual learning, culture, social) and systems (technology, process and infrastructure). 

syllk modelSyllk model

Until next time….Stephen